Category: Head Injury

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention New Data Available on WISQARS Nonfatal Injury and Leading Causes of Nonfatal Injury Modules The Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) is an interactive, online database that provides fatal and nonfatal injury data from a variety of sources. Researchers, practitioners, the media, and the general public can

Oct 08, 2014 The fact that 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions occur each year as a result of sport and physical activity indicates the need for more people to have a better awareness of concussion management. This article describes why a team approach to concussion education is necessary, and provides specific strategies for concussion prevention.

Oct 08, 2014 Although it is well established that sex is a risk factor in acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI) among adolescents, it has not been established whether it also moderates the influence of other TBI psychological health correlates. The Moderating Effects of Sex and Age on the Association between Traumatic Brain Injury and

Oct 08, 2014 This month’s CDC Vital Signs series presents the latest CDC findings on the health burden and costs of motor vehicle crash injuries in the United States. The issue includes proven strategies for increasing restraint use, reducing impaired driving, and improving teen driver safety. CDC Vital Signs October: “Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries: Costly

Huffington Post Article by Shannon Babineau, MD Assistant Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Director of Pediatric Headache Medicine, The Mount Sinai Hospital A new school year has begun. Playgrounds are full of children chasing, tumbling and climbing. Sports fields teem with young athletes practicing football, field hockey, and

New research suggests that people with more education recover significantly better from serious head injuries. Scientists from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore found that adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries who had earned at least an undergraduate degree were more than seven times as likely to completely recover from their injury than those